Herbaceous Wetland Plants


ARROWHEAD/WAPATO DUCK POTATO (Sagittaria latifolia) SALAt - Beautiful, medium green, arrow-shaped leaves; white flowers with yellow centers bloom in mid-summer. A hardy, tuberous plant that will tolerate periods of drought and fluctuating water levels. Reaches 2.5 feet in height. Grows best in rich, damp lowland soils or planted in water up to 1.5 feet in depth. Excellent choice for filtering nutrient-rich runoff. Waterfowl, muskrats, and even deer favor the tender shoots, tubers, and seeds.

BULRUSHES (Scirpus spp.) - Hard-coated seeds are common food source for ducks, marshbirds and shorebirds. Stems and roots are eaten by muskrats and geese. Important nesting cover for waterfowl, marsh wrens, and blackbirds. Protective cover for muskrats, otters, raccoons and others. Taller species provide excellent blinds. Stout stems and strong, fibrous root systems make these plants ideal for erosion control, bank protection projects and bio-filtration purposes. Many Native American Tribes used "tule" reeds (hard- or softstem bulrush stems) for mats, shelters, blinds, and other purposes.
    a) BULRUSH, ALKALI (Scirpus maritimus, also robustus) SCMA - Angular-stemmed plant that grows in clusters in alkaline or saline soils of marshes, wet meadows, and margins of ponds.

    b) BULRUSH, HARDSTEM (Scirpus acutus) SCAC - Round-stemmed plant that grows 4 to 5 feet high or taller. Plant in wet soil or in shallow water, up to 1.5 feet in depth, along shorelines. Tolerates some alkali but not as much as alkali bulrush. Great cover and food source.

    c) BULRUSH, SMALL-FRUITED (Scirpus microcarpus) SCMI - Hardy plant with abundant grass-like leaves. Produces clusters of small, brown flowers at the end of secondary stems. Grows 2 to 5 feet high. Common along streams and freshwater marshes. Thrives in saturated soils and shallow seasonal standing water. Covers well, great for ponds and wetlands where waters recede.

    d) BULRUSH, SOFTSTEM (Scirpus validus) SCVA - Round-stemmed plant that can grow 4 to 5 feet high. Thrives in damp soil and up to 10 inches of water and is tolerant of fresh, acid, saline, or alkaline waters.

    e) BULRUSH, THREE-SQUARE (Scirpus pungens) SCPU - Triangular-stemmed plant that grows 4 to 6 feet high. Thrives in wet soil on the edges of ponds, lakes, and streams but will also grow in water up to 12 inches deep. Tolerant of moderate alkalinity.

    f) WOOLGRASS (Scirpus cyperinus) SCCY - Grass-like plant that grows to 3 to 5 feet in height. Lacks rhizomes; forms individual tufts. Single plants found scattered throughout marshes and other wet soil environments.

Planting augers make quick work of creating planting holes for our plants, as do dibbles. Solid, healthy root plugs and aggressive rooted plants combine for quick establishment.

PRICES

6 cu. in.
10 cu. in.
20 cu. in.
Tall One, 1 Gallon


$1.00 ea.

$1.50 ea.

$2.50 ea.

$6.00 ea.



BUR-REED (Sparganium eurycarpum) SPEU
- Rhizomatous plant that grows 2 to 4 feet in height. Thrives in wet soils and in water up to 1.5 feet deep at the perimeter of lakes, ponds, or low velocity streams. Large seeds provide fantastic food source and tall, lush vegetation provides excellent cover and nesting habitat for waterfowl, pheasants, marshbirds, and other wildlife. Muskrats eat young shoots and rhizomes and use leaves and other plant parts for nesting materials. Research results have documented that bur-reed can be beneficial in removing heavy metals from water or soil.

CATTAIL, COMMON (Typha latifolia) TYLA - Aggressive, hardy plant that grows 5 to 7 feet in height. Thrives in damp soil and up to 10 inches of water. Provides cover for wild ducks and geese and an important winter cover for pheasants and other gamebirds. Starchy, underground stems used by geese and muskrats. Valuable as house-building material for muskrats. Makes a good blind. Can dominate at the fringes of ponds and ditches.

RUSHES (Juncus spp.) - Perennial wetland plants, most with round-stems and most not jointed. Greenish to purplish-brown or black flower clusters originate laterally from the stem, at the top of the stem, or from terminal branches. Leaves are grass-like but usually short and inconspicuous. Typically round stems often form dense tufts. Provide cover and food source for wildlife. Fine fibrous root systems stabilize soils and streambanks.
    a) RUSH, BALTIC (Juncus balticus) JUBA - Plant grows 1 to 3 feet tall, either singly or in small clumps along black, creeping rhizomes. Flowers grow loosely from short, fine branches appearing laterally on wiry stems. Thrives in moist to saturated meadow soils and along the shores of ponds, lakes, streams, and rivers, drying in summer. Found in saline or alkaline sites. Also known as wiregrass.

    b) RUSH, COMMON/SOFT (Juncus effusus) JUEF - Rhizomatous plant grows in large clumps of several hundred stems from 1 to 4 feet in height. Thrives along shorelines and in wet meadows and shallow pools. Flowers grow in a dense cluster that appears to originate directly from stem. Plant in wet soils and up to 6 inches of fluctuating water. Typically found just above perennial waterline

    c) RUSH, DAGGER-LEAF (Juncus ensifolius) JUEN - Short in stature, usually not more than 1 foot tall. Stems arise singly or a few together from creeping rhizomes. Distinct, flattened, sword-shaped leaves. Small, dense, rounded flower heads form from short branches at the end of the stem. Found in moist sites, stream point bars, rarely in standing water.

    d) RUSH, JOINTED (Juncus articulatus) JUAR - Stems can form both loose and dense clumps along rhizomes. Flowers originate on widely spreading terminal branches. Leaves are circular in cross-section, pulpy, and contain inside partitions (or joints). Plant grows from 6 to 20 inches tall and is found in many types of wetlands, along ponds, ditches, sandbars, and streambanks.

    d) RUSH, SLENDER (Juncus tenuis) JUTE - Short, tufted, thin, stems, with fibrous roots. Plant often found along ditches, stream banks, and spring seeps. Often occurs along wet trails and paths – hence its other common names - Path- or Poverty Rush


SEDGES (Carex spp.) - Perennial plants with triangular shaped stems and grass-like leaves. Most species spread by rhizomes and have deep, fibrous root systems beneficial for erosion control and bank protection. Found in both lowland and upland environments. Seeds are eaten by many meadow and marsh bird species. Provides nesting and protective cover for birds, waterfowl, and other wildlife.

    a) SEDGE, BEAKED (Carex utriculata) CAUT - Grows 2 to 4 feet tall with stout, erect stems. Strong, extensive, rhizomatous root system provides excellent erosion control. Very common in wet meadows, stream banks, and marshes. Distinctive large, dense flower heads. Seeds have beaked tip.

    b) SEDGE, BIG-LEAF (Carex amplifolia) CAAM - Stems arising singly or a few together from long, creeping rhizomes. Grows 2 to 4 feet tall and has very broad leaves. Thrives in wet soils along woodland and prairie streams and freshwater marshes.

    c) SEDGE, INFLATED (Carex vesicaria) CAVE - Grows to 2.5 feet tall. Slender, reclining stems with loosely clustered flower heads. Spreads from short rhizomes. Grows in wet meadows

    d) SEDGE, LENS (Carex lenticularis) CALE - Grows up to 1.5 feet in height. Clumped, pale blue or green leaves. Found on sand bars and in very wet sandy soils on the edges of streams, lakes, and marshes.

    e) SEDGE, NEBRASKA (Carex nebrascensis) CANE - Blue-green leaves grows 1 to 3 feet high. Vigorously rhizomatous. Commonly found in wetlands, and along streams and rivers, but will tolerate some drying.

    f) SEDGE, SHORT-BEAKED (Carex simulata) CASI - Plant grows 1-2 feet tall from well developed rhizomes. Common in wet meadows and mashes.

    g) SEDGE, SMALL-WINGED (Carex microptera) CAMI - Grows to 24 inches. Found in woodlands and wet meadows. Tolerates dry soil – often found in meadow sites cut for hay.

    i ) SEDGE, WOOLY (Carex lanuginosa) CALA - Grows 2-3 feet tall in wooded wetlands, wet meadows, and prairies. Plant stems arise from creeping rhizomes.
SMARTWEED (Polygonum bistortoides) POBI - Perennial wetland plant that grows in wet soils and in fresh water up to 10 inches deep in marshes and along the margins of lakes and ponds. Seeds a preferred food for all types of waterfowl, marshbirds, and songbirds.

SPIKE-RUSH, COMMON (CREEPING) (Eleocharis palustris) ELPA - Rush-like perennial that spreads by rhizomes. Grows 1 to 3 feet in height, in tufts of erect, slender stems with few leaves. Thrives in perennially moist to saturated soil conditions with seasonal standing water. Tolerant of alkali.

Wildlife need food and cover to survive. Planting a diversity of native plants will result in year-round enjoyment. Our professionals can help you plan your habitat project.

PRICES

6 cu. in.
10 cu. in.
20 cu. in.
Tall One, 1 Gallon


$1.00 ea.

$1.50 ea.

$2.50 ea.

$6.00 ea.